Reading the Forested Landscape of the Community Forest

These photographs were taken during the Reading the Forested Landscape workshop with Tom Wessels on June 28th, 2015. Look for these features when visiting the Community Forest.

Cut or dead fall?
Cut or dead fall?

One big clue is that no log is left behind. It is also cut at a height off the ground. Deadfall tends to break at ground level where rotting begins. Live trees tend to break midway up the trunk where forces are greatest. The black charcoal mat fungus indicates that this must be a maple, beech or elm stump and in this case most likely red maple.

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Callus growth on hemlock stump
Callus growth on hemlock stump

Callus growth on this hemlock stump. This stump must be root-grafted to a nearby hemlock allowing it to continue to grow. You can determine the age by counting the layers on the callus growth.

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Small rocks confirm cropland
Small rocks confirm cropland

Priscilla holds one of many small rocks from this stone wall that confirm that the bordering land (on the far side) was cultivated for crops.

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Cut or dead fall?
Cut or dead fall?

One big clue is that no log is left behind. It is also cut at a height off the ground. Deadfall tends to break at ground level where rotting begins. Live trees tend to break midway up the trunk where forces are greatest. The black charcoal mat fungus indicates that this must be a maple, beech or elm stump and in this case most likely red maple.

press to zoom
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